Holly's blog

I spied-a spider: Microscope work isn’t as daunting as it appears!

Lorna is a PhD student at Cardiff University studying the variation in the diet of British Otters.  She won a place on the "Tomorrow's Invertebrate Recorders" course - a week long residential programme for young people run by the FSC BioLinks project  and A Focus On Nature providing an introduction to surveying invertebrates.  She tells us about her experience with spider identification. Since the course Lorna has bought a USB microscope to continue improving her identification skills so she can record invertebrates in her area. 

Bushy Park Open Lab Days

These days are perfect for beginners to practice their identification skills, especially for those who don’t have access to microscopes or ID resources at home and for those wanting to get “into” a new group who can use the days as opportunities to test out the ID keys available first. Likewise, they’re proving to be useful for more experienced entomologists and recorders, who use the days as an opportunity to meet up with other recorders, to work on their own collections of specimens and also to make use of our resources. 

Who's who in the world of biological recording?

Britain is very lucky to have a rich history in biological recording. As a result, the UK has a well developed network of organisations involved in biological recording. Getting your head around what these recording organisations do and how they can help you can be confusing, so we hope this will provide some clarity!

What is a biological record?

The FSC BioLinks project provides training to develop the skills of existing biological recorders and to create new recorders. We're doing this to build and strengthen the biological recording community…but what is a biological record?

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